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The Three Little Pigs / Три поросенка и другие сказки

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Подготовка текста, комментарии, упражнения и словарь С. А. Матвеева; иллюстрации М. М. Салтыкова

© Матвеев С. А., подготовка текста, комментарии, упражнения, словарь

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The Three Little Pigs


Once upon a time there were three little pigs and the time came for them to leave home and seek their fortunes.

Before they left, their mother told them, “Whatever you do, do it the best that you can because that’s the way to get along in the world.[1]

So three little pigs left their mother to find homes for themselves.

The first pig met a man with the bundle of straw. “Please, man,” said the pig, “will you let me have that bundle of straw to build my house?” “Yes, here, take it,” said the kind man. The little pig was very pleased and at once built his house out of straw[2] because it was the easiest thing to do.

The second little pig said goodbye to his mother and set out.[3] Before long[4] he met a man with the bundle of sticks. “Please, man,” he said, “will you let me have that bundle of sticks to build my house?” “Yes, you can have it, here it is,” said the kind man. So the second little pig was very pleased and built his house out of sticks.[5] This was a little bit stronger[6] than a straw house. Then last of all the third little pig set out and met a man with load of bricks. “Please, man,” he said, “will you let me have that load of bricks to build my house?”

“Yes, here they are, all for you,” said the kind man. The third little pig was very pleased and built his house out of bricks.[7]

One night the big bad wolf, who dearly loved to eat fat little piggies, came along and saw the first little pig in his new house of straw. The wolf knocked on the door, and said, “Let me in, let me in, little pig or I’ll huff and I’ll puff[8] and I’ll blow your house in![9]

“No, not by the hair of my chinny chin chin,[10] I’ll not let you in!” said the little pig.

“Now I’ll huff and I’ll puff and I’ll blow your house down,” cried the wolf.

And of course[11] the wolf did blow the house in and ate the first little pig.

The wolf then came to the house of sticks and knocked at the door. “Little pig, little pig,” he said, “open up your door and let me in!”

Now the second little pig remembered what his mother had told him, so he too said, “No, not by the hair on my chinny chin chin, I’ll not let you in.”

“Now I’ll huff and I’ll puff and I’ll blow your house down!” cried the wolf. But the little pig went on saying, “No, not by the hair on my chinny chin chin, I’ll not let you in.” So again the old wolf huffed and he puffed and he huffed and he puffed, this time it was much harder work, but finally down came the house. The wolf blew that house in too, and ate the second little pig.

The wolf then came to the house of bricks and again he said. “Little pig, little pig, open your door and let me in!”

But like his brothers the third little pig said, “No, not by the hair on my chinny chin chin, I’ll not let you in.”

“Now I’ll huff and I’ll puff and I’ll blow your house down!” cried the wolf. And when the third little pig wouldn’t open the door he huffed and he puffed and he huffed and he puffed, then he tried again but the brick house was so strong that he could not blow it down.

Well, the wolf huffed and puffed again and again, but he could not blow down that brick house.

This made the wolf very angry.

When he found that he could not, with all his huffing and puffing, blow the house down, he said, “Little pig, I know where there is a nice field of turnips.”

“Where?” said the little pig.

“Oh, in Mr. Smith’s home field, and if you are ready tomorrow morning I will call for you, and we will go together and get some for dinner.”

“Very well,” said the little pig, “I will be ready. What time do you mean to go?”

“Oh, at six o’clock.”

Well, the little pig got up[12] at five, and got the turnips before the wolf came (which he did about six) and who said, “Little pig, are you ready?”

The little pig said, “Ready! I have been and come back again, and got nice turnips for dinner.”

The wolf felt very angry at this, but thought that he would be up to the little pig somehow or other, so he said, “Little pig, I know where there is a nice apple tree.”

“Where?” said the pig.

“Down at Merry Garden,” replied the wolf, “and if you will not deceive me I will come for you, at five o’clock tomorrow and get some apples.”

Well, the little pig bustled up the next morning at four o’clock, and went off for the apples, hoping to get back before the wolf came; but he had further to go, and had to climb the tree, so that just as he was coming down from it, he saw the wolf coming, which, as you may suppose, frightened him very much.

When the wolf came up he said, “Little pig, what! Are you here before me? Are they nice apples?”

“Yes, very,” said the little pig. “I will throw you down one.” And he threw it so far, that, while the wolf was gone to pick it up, the little pig jumped down and ran home.

The next day the wolf came again, and said to the little pig, “Little pig, there is a fair this afternoon. Will you go?”

“Oh yes,” said the pig, “I will go. What time shall you be ready?”

“At three,” said the wolf. So the little pig went off before the time as usual, and got to the fair, and bought a butter churn, which he was going home with, when he saw the wolf coming. Then he could not tell what to do. So he got into the churn to hide, and by so doing turned it around, and it rolled down the hill with the pig in it, which frightened the wolf so much, that he ran home without going to the fair. He went to the pig’s house, and told him how frightened he had been by a great round thing which came down the hill past him.

 

Then the little pig said, “Ha, I frightened you, then. I had been to the fair and bought a butter churn, and when I saw you, I got into it, and rolled down the hill.”

Then the wolf was very angry indeed, and declared he would eat up the little pig! The wolf was a sly old wolf and he climbed up on the roof of the little brick house to look for a way into the brick house.

He roared down the chimney, “I’m coming down to eat you up!” The little pig saw the wolf climb up on the roof, so the pig had put a pot of boiling water on the fire and now he took off the lid.

When the wolf finally found the hole in the chimney he crawled down the chimney and – splash![13] right into the pot. Quickly the little pig put down the cover and boiled up the old wolf for his dinner. That was the end of his troubles with the big bad wolf.

The next day the little pig invited his mother to visit him. She said, “You see it is just as I told you.[14] The way to get along in the world is to do things as well as you can.” Fortunately for that little pig, he learned that lesson. And he just lived happily ever after![15]

Упражнения

1. Выберите правильный вариант:

1. A big bad wolf is unable to destroy the third pig’s house, made of straw.

2. A big bad wolf is unable to destroy the third pig’s house, made of sticks.

3. A big bad wolf is unable to destroy the third pig’s house, made of bricks.

4. A big bad wolf is unable to destroy the third pig’s house, made of glass.


2. How does the wolf attempt to trick the pig out of the house?

1. The wolf attempts to trick the pig out of the house by showing him turnips.

2. The wolf attempts to trick the pig out of the house by asking to meet him at various places.

3. The wolf attempts to trick the pig out of the house by giving him red apples.

4. The wolf attempts to trick the pig out of the house by offering him some help.


3. What is a chin?

1. one of the two channels of the nose

2. the organ of vision

3. the lowermost part of the face

4. the organ that detects sound


4. Where does the pig catch the wolf?

1. The pig catches the wolf in a cauldron of cold water.

2. The pig catches the wolf in a box.

3. The pig catches the wolf in a jar.

4. The pig catches the wolf in a cauldron of boiling water.


5. The most well-known version of the story is an award-winning cartoon, which was produced by ___________________.

1. Jack Elrod

2. Charles Gibson

3. Walt Disney

4. Benjamin Franklin

6. Выберите правильный вариант:

1. A big bad wolf is able to blow down the first two pigs’ houses, made of bricks and wood respectively.

2. A big bad wolf is able to blow down the first two pigs’ houses, made of straw and wood respectively.

3. A big bad wolf is able to blow down the first two pigs’ houses, made of straw and bricks respectively.

4. A big bad wolf is able to blow down the first two pigs’ houses, made of glass and wood respectively.


7. What does it mean, “to seek their fortune”?

1. to go in search or quest of luck

2. to ask for advice

3. to try to obtain some food

4. to attempt to do something


8. Why did the first pig build his house out of straw?

1. Because he was nervous.

2. Because he had much straw.

3. Because it was the easiest thing to do.

4. Because he did not know what to do.


9. Выберите нужный глагол:

The wolf then _____________ to the house of sticks and knocked at the door.

1. blew

2. gave

3. came

4. come


10. Выберите нужные глаголы:

When the wolf finally _____________ the hole in the chimney he ____________ down the chimney and ___________ right into the pot.


1. found, fell, crawled

2. crawled, fell, found

3. fell, found, crawled

4. found, crawled, fell


11. Выберите нужный послелог:

for – of – out – on

The third pig’s brick house turns _____________ to be the only one which is adequate to withstand the wolf.


12. Ответьте на вопросы:

1. How many animals are mentioned in the story?

2. What Merry Garden?

3. What have you learned about the piggies?

4. What do you like and what don’t you like in the story?

5. What would you do if you were[16] the main character of the story?

6. What is the end of the story?

7. Retell the story.


13. Заполните таблицу:


Ответы

1. A big bad wolf is unable to destroy the third pig’s house, made of bricks.

2. The wolf attempts to trick the pig out of the house by asking to meet him at various places.

3. the lowermost part of the face

4. The pig catches the wolf in a cauldron of boiling water.

5. The most well-known version of the story is an award-winning cartoon, which was produced by Walt Disney.

6. A big bad wolf is able to blow down the first two pigs’ houses, made of straw and wood respectively.

7. to go in search or quest of luck

8. Because it was the easiest thing to do.

9. The wolf then came to the house of sticks and knocked at the door.

10. When the wolf finally found the hole in the chimney he crawled down the chimney and fell right into the pot.

11.

out; The third pig’s brick house turns out to be the only one which is adequate to withstand the wolf.

13.

The Fish and the Ring

Once upon a time, there was a mighty Baron in the North Country who was a great magician and knew everything that would come to pass.[17] So one day, when his little boy was four years old, he looked into the Book of Fate[18] to see what would happen to him. And to his dismay, he found that his son would wed a lowly maid[19] that had just been born in a small house. Now the Baron knew the father of the little girl was very, very poor, and he had five children already. So he called for his horse, and rode to the father’s house, and saw him sitting by the door, sad and doleful. So he dismounted and went up to him and said, “What is the matter, my good man?” And the man said, “Well, your honour,[20] the fact is, I have five children already, and now the sixth one comes, a little girl, and where to get the bread from to fill their mouths, that’s more than I can say.”

“Don’t cry, my dear man,” said the Baron. “If that’s your trouble, I can help you. I’ll take away the last little one, and you won’t have to bother about her.”

“Thank you kindly, sir,” said the man; and he went in and brought out the little girl and gave her to the Baron, who mounted his horse and rode away with her. And when he got by the bank of the river, he threw the little girl into the river, and rode off to his castle.

But the little girl didn’t sink; her clothes kept her up for a time,[21] and she floated, and she floated, till she was cast ashore just in front of a fisherman’s hut. There the fisherman found her, and took pity on the poor little girl and took her into his house, and she lived there till she was fifteen years old. So she became a fine handsome girl.

One day it happened that the Baron went out hunting[22] with some companions along the banks of the river, and stopped at the fisherman’s hut to get a drink, and the girl came out to give it to them. They all noticed her beauty, and one of them said to the Baron, “You can read fates, Baron, whom will she marry, how do you think?”

“Oh! that’s easy to guess,” said the Baron; “some farmer or other. But I’ll cast her horoscope. Come here, girl, and tell me on what day you were born.”

“I don’t know, sir,” said the girl, “I was picked up just here. The river brought me down[23] about fifteen years ago.”

Then the Baron knew who she was, and when they went away, he rode back and said to the girl, “Listen to me, girl, I will make your fortune. Take this letter to my brother, and you will be settled for life.” And the girl took the letter and said she would go. Now this is what he had written in the letter:

“Dear brother,

Take the bearer and put her to death immediately.”

So soon after the girl left, and slept for the night at a little inn. Now that very night[24] a band of robbers broke into the inn, and searched the girl, who had no money, and only the letter. So they opened this and read it. The captain of the robbers took a pen and paper and wrote this letter:

 

“Dear brother,

Take the bearer and marry her to my son immediately.”

And then he gave it to the girl. So she went on to the Baron’s brother, a noble knight, with whom the Baron’s son was staying. When she gave the letter to his brother, he gave orders for the wedding to be prepared at once, and they were married that very day.[25]

Soon after, the Baron himself came to his brother’s castle, and what was his surprise! But he took the girl out for a walk, as he said, along the cliffs. And when he got her all alone, he took her by the arms, and was going to throw her over. But she begged hard for her life.[26] “I have not done anything,” she said, “please do not kill me, I will do whatever you wish. I will never see you or your son again till you desire it.” Then the Baron took off his gold ring and threw it into the sea, saying, “Never let me see your face till you can show me that ring”; and he let her go.[27]

The poor girl wandered on and on, till at last she came to a great noble’s castle,[28] and she said that she could do any work. So they gave her some kitchen work, and she began to cook food.

One day the Baron and his brother and his son, her husband, came up to the noble’s house. She didn’t know what to do; but thought they would not see her in the castle kitchen. So she went back to her work with a sigh, and set to cleaning a huge big fish that was to be boiled for their dinner. And, as she was cleaning it, she saw something shine inside it.[29] What do you think she found? Why, there was the Baron’s ring, the very one he had thrown over the cliff.[30] She was glad indeed to see it, you may be sure. Then she cooked the fish as nicely as she could, and served it up. Well, when the fish came on the table, the guests liked it so well that they asked the noble who cooked it. He said he didn’t know, but called to his servants, “Hey, there, send the cook who cooked that fine fish.” So they went down to the kitchen and told the girl she was wanted in the hall.

When the guests saw such a young and beautiful cook they were surprised. But the Baron was very angry. So the girl went up to him with her hand before her with the ring on it; and she put it down before him on the table. Then at last the Baron saw that no one could fight against Fate, and he handed her to a seat and announced to all the company that this was his son’s true wife. And he took her and his son home to his castle; and they all lived happy.

The Master and His Pupil

There was once a very learned man in the north-country who knew all the languages under the sun, and who was acquainted with all the mysteries of the world. He had one big book bound in black calf and clasped with iron, and with iron corners, and chained to a table on the floor. When he read this book, he unlocked it with an iron key. This famous book contained all the secrets of the spiritual world. It told how many angels there were in heaven, and how they marched in their ranks, and sang, and what were their several functions, and what was the name of each great angel of might. And it told of the demons, how many of them there were, and what were their several powers, and their labours, and their names, and how they might be summoned,[31] and how tasks might be imposed on them,[32] and how they might be chained to be as slaves to man.[33]

Now the master had a pupil who was a foolish lad, and he acted as servant to the great master. The boy was never allowed[34] to look into the black book, hardly to enter the private room.

One day the master was out. The lad was very curious. So he hurried to the chamber where his master kept his wonderful apparatus for changing copper into gold, and lead into silver. There was his magic mirror in which he could see all that was passing in the world. There also was the shell which when held to the ear[35] whispered all the words that were spoken by anyone the master desired to know about. The lad tried in vain[36] with the crucibles to turn copper and lead into gold and silver. He looked long and vainly into the mirror; smoke and clouds passed over it, but he saw nothing plain. And the shell produced to his ear only indistinct murmurings, like the breaking of distant seas on an unknown shore. “I can do nothing,” he said; “as I don’t know the right words to utter, and they are locked up in that magic book.”

He looked round, and, see! the book was not locked. The master had forgotten to lock it before he went out. The boy rushed to it, and opened the volume. It was written with red and black ink, and much of it he could not understand. But he put his finger on a line and spelled it through.

At once the room was darkened, and the house trembled; a clap of thunder rolled through the passage and the old room, and there stood before him a horrible, horrible form, breathing fire, and with eyes like burning lamps. It was the demon, whom he had called up[37] to serve him.

“Set me a task![38]” said he, with a voice like the roaring of an iron furnace.

The boy only trembled, and his hair stood up.

“Set me a task, or I shall strangle you!”

But the lad could not speak. Then the evil spirit stepped towards him, and putting forth his hands touched his throat. The fingers burned his flesh. “Set me a task!”

“Water that flower,” cried the boy in despair, pointing to a geranium which stood in a pot on the floor. Instantly the spirit left the room, but in another instant he returned with a barrel on his back, and poured its contents over the flower; and again and again he went and came, and poured more and more water, till the floor of the room was ankle-deep.[39]

“Enough, enough!” gasped the lad; but the demon did not hear him. The lad didn’t know the words by which to send him away, and still he fetched water.

It rose to the boy’s knees and still more water was poured. It mounted to his waist, and the demon still kept on bringing barrels full. It rose to his armpits, and he scrambled to the table-top. And now the water in the room stood up to the window and washed against the glass, and around his feet on the table. It still rose; it reached his breast. The poor boy cried, but all was useless. The evil spirit was pouring and pouring and pouring water. But the master remembered on his journey that he had not locked his book, and therefore returned, and at the moment when the water was bubbling about the pupil’s chin, rushed into the room and spoke the words which cast the demon back into his fiery home.

1that’s the way to get along in the world – так вы сможете выжить в этом мире
2built his house out of straw – построил свой дом из соломы
3set out – отправился в путь
4before long – вскоре
5built his house out of sticks – построил свой дом из ветвей
6a little bit stronger – немного прочнее
7built his house out of bricks – построил свой дом из камней
8I’ll huff and I’ll puff – я возьму и дуну
9I’ll blow your house in! – Я сдую твой дом!
10Not by the hair of my chinny chin chin! – Не получится, клянусь своей бородой!
11of course – конечно
12got up – встал, проснулся
13splash! – плюх!
14it is just as I told you – всё, как я тебе и говорила
15And he just lived happily ever after! – И жил потом ещё счастливее!
16What would you do if you were – что бы вы сделали на месте
17knew everything that would come to pass – знал всё, что произойдёт
18the Book of Fate – Книга Судеб
19a lowly maid – девушка из низшего сословия
20your honour – ваша часть
21kept her up for a time – держали её некоторое время на плаву
22went out hunting – отправился на охоту
23the river brought me down – река вынесла меня
24now that very night – и как раз в ту самую ночь
25that very day – в тот же день
26she begged hard for her life – она молила пощадить её жизнь
27and he let her go – и он отпустил её
28great noble’s castle – замок знатного господина
29she saw something shine inside it – она увидела, как что-то внутри неё блестит
30the very one he had thrown over the cliff – то самое, которое он бросил со скалы
31how they might be summoned – как их можно вызвать
32how tasks might be imposed on them – как им приказывать
33to be as slaves to man – чтобы стали рабами человека
34the boy was never allowed – мальчику никогда не дозволялось
35which when held to the ear – которая, если её приложить к уху
36in vain – напрасно
37whom he had called up – которого он вызвал
38Set me a task! – Приказывай мне!
39the floor of the room was ankle-deep – воды в комнате стало по щиколотку
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